m1x1x1 Nobody's done it before.

Scarborough
Bicycles
Graphic Design
Photography

by Jose Ongpin
Tuesday 3/25/2014

(1 note)

What I’ve been up to…

I’ve left my comfortable, corporate job. It has been a good one year, 9 months of sitting in a cubicle doing monotonous work 90% at the time. It got me enough money to move out, but I used corporate time to surf Reddit and look through design blogs and podcasts (such as 99% Invisible) to keep myself sane. 8 hours of sales brochures and e-mailers are definitely not inspiring at all.

Since the end of January, I’ve been working on my portfolio. Job searching is slow, and admittedly I do not have everything organised because of my ways of working and procrastinating.

What I’ve learned so far…

I hated working in the corporate environment. I suppose I’ve given them the best work and value for their money, but in the end I was not satisfied with office politics and the nature of work that I had to do. I was stressed out as a result, and ultimately resulting in rage quitting blaming it all on Adobe Illustrator, losing 6 hours of work after a software crash.

What to do next?

Recently, I’ve had a bit of an epiphany when I volunteered my time to do social media for an event for Toronto350.org, an environmental organisation campaigning for #divestment in endowment funds from the University of Toronto. The event raised awareness for climate change through their use of internet memes – pop culture appropriations with messages of humour ”an idea, style or action which spreads, often as mimicry, from person to person via the Internet, as with imitating the concept.” (wiki)

I felt a renewed sense of responsibility as a designer to do something different and experimental as a result.

M1X1X1 for 2014

I hope to create some exciting projects and expand upon what I’ve already posted on tumblr. I am in the process of making my personal website, but I haven’t started it at all. I’d like to do something different. 

M1X1X1 will transition beyond Scarborough; I’ve been living in the neighbouring Borough of East York for the last 6 months, and I hope to post personal projects that reflect on the geographical shift.

In the pipeline, there will be some exciting things going on with my creative partner Tina Matei – Suburban Children or SUCH. We haven’t set up a site yet, so follow us on the twitters. Our first project will be dealing with Economics explained through Relationships.

I will continue to post work that deals with the built environment, of course it’s all the matter of just doing them and not procrastinating about.

Indeed, the original Vignelli map from the 1970s and subsequent iterations (the NYC Subway Weekender used for construction works) is aesthetically pleasing and iconic in it’s own right. However, many problems arise when it comes to expansion beyond a map’s intended purpose, in this case adding a regional system from New Jersey that integrally connects with New York City.
transitmaps:

Official Map: New York/New Jersey Regional Transit Diagram — Full Review
After our first glimpse yesterday, now it’s time for a more in-depth look at this map. Thanks to everyone who sent me a link to the PDF (and there were more than a few of you)!
First things first: this MTA press release confirms that the map was designed by Yoshiki Waterhouse of Vignelli Associates. It’s definitely nice to see that the original creators of the diagram continue to shape its future, rather than being handed off to another design team.
That said, the original source that this map is based off — the 2008 revision of Vignelli’s classic 1970s diagram, as used on the MTA’s “Weekender” service update website — actually creates some problems for this version of the map.
Because the bright primary colours used for the Subway’s many route lines are so much a part of the map’s look (and indeed, the very fabric of the Subway itself, appearing on signage and trains across the entire system) it forces the NJ Transit, PATH and Amtrak routes shown to be rendered in muted pastel tones in order to differentiate them from the Subway. This results in a visual imbalance between the New York and New Jersey sides of the map: cool and muted on the left, bright and bold to the right. I also feel that the PATH lines up to 33rd Street become a little “lost” compared to the adjacent subway lines.
The other result of using pastel route lines is a loss of contrast between all those lines: they all register at a similar visual intensity, making them a little harder to differentiate. Because of the sheer number of lines that have to be shown, some of the NJ Transit routes have lost their “traditional” colour as used on their own official map (Nov. 2011, 1.5 stars). The Bergen County Line is no longer light blue, but the same yellow as the Main Line, while the Gladstone Line now uses the same green as the Morristown Line. Their original colours get redistributed to New Jersey’s light rail lines and Amtrak.
Some people have noticed that the map shows weekday off-peak services and commented that this is useless for the Super Bowl, which is held on a Sunday. However, the map has to be useful for the entire week of Super Bowl festivities, not just game day, so I feel it’s doing the best it can under the circumstances. If it really bothers you, @TheLIRRToday on Twitter has made a quick and dirty version of the map that shows weekend service patterns. As as has been pointed out to me, service on Super Bowl Weekend will be close to that of the weekday peak, so the difference is negligible anyway.
What bothers me is the fact that the football icon has an extra row of laces. NFL balls have eight rows of laces — the icon shows nine.
Our rating: Based on the classic Vignelli diagram. While it remains true to its minimalist roots, it doesn’t reach the heights of its predecessors. The need to integrate so many different routes and services while retaining familiar route colours for the Subway mean that the left half of the map isn’t as visually strong as the right. Still far better than many North American transit maps. It would also make a neat souvenir of a trip to the Super Bowl! Three stars. 

(Source: NJ Transit “First Mass Transit Super Bowl" web page — also available on the MTA website)
Friday 12/13/2013

(44 notes)

Indeed, the original Vignelli map from the 1970s and subsequent iterations (the NYC Subway Weekender used for construction works) is aesthetically pleasing and iconic in it’s own right. However, many problems arise when it comes to expansion beyond a map’s intended purpose, in this case adding a regional system from New Jersey that integrally connects with New York City.

transitmaps:

Official Map: New York/New Jersey Regional Transit Diagram — Full Review

After our first glimpse yesterday, now it’s time for a more in-depth look at this map. Thanks to everyone who sent me a link to the PDF (and there were more than a few of you)!

First things first: this MTA press release confirms that the map was designed by Yoshiki Waterhouse of Vignelli Associates. It’s definitely nice to see that the original creators of the diagram continue to shape its future, rather than being handed off to another design team.

That said, the original source that this map is based off — the 2008 revision of Vignelli’s classic 1970s diagram, as used on the MTA’s “Weekender” service update website — actually creates some problems for this version of the map.

Because the bright primary colours used for the Subway’s many route lines are so much a part of the map’s look (and indeed, the very fabric of the Subway itself, appearing on signage and trains across the entire system) it forces the NJ Transit, PATH and Amtrak routes shown to be rendered in muted pastel tones in order to differentiate them from the Subway. This results in a visual imbalance between the New York and New Jersey sides of the map: cool and muted on the left, bright and bold to the right. I also feel that the PATH lines up to 33rd Street become a little “lost” compared to the adjacent subway lines.

The other result of using pastel route lines is a loss of contrast between all those lines: they all register at a similar visual intensity, making them a little harder to differentiate. Because of the sheer number of lines that have to be shown, some of the NJ Transit routes have lost their “traditional” colour as used on their own official map (Nov. 2011, 1.5 stars). The Bergen County Line is no longer light blue, but the same yellow as the Main Line, while the Gladstone Line now uses the same green as the Morristown Line. Their original colours get redistributed to New Jersey’s light rail lines and Amtrak.

Some people have noticed that the map shows weekday off-peak services and commented that this is useless for the Super Bowl, which is held on a Sunday. However, the map has to be useful for the entire week of Super Bowl festivities, not just game day, so I feel it’s doing the best it can under the circumstances. If it really bothers you, @TheLIRRToday on Twitter has made a quick and dirty version of the map that shows weekend service patterns. As as has been pointed out to me, service on Super Bowl Weekend will be close to that of the weekday peak, so the difference is negligible anyway.

What bothers me is the fact that the football icon has an extra row of laces. NFL balls have eight rows of laces — the icon shows nine.

Our rating: Based on the classic Vignelli diagram. While it remains true to its minimalist roots, it doesn’t reach the heights of its predecessors. The need to integrate so many different routes and services while retaining familiar route colours for the Subway mean that the left half of the map isn’t as visually strong as the right. Still far better than many North American transit maps. It would also make a neat souvenir of a trip to the Super Bowl! Three stars. 

3 Stars

(Source: NJ Transit “First Mass Transit Super Bowl" web page — also available on the MTA website)


Drake at Scarborough Town Centre (STC) Earlier Today

#drizzyformayor
Wednesday 11/6/2013

(410 notes)

Drake at Scarborough Town Centre (STC) Earlier Today

#drizzyformayor

(via fuckyesitsdrake)

Friday 9/20/2013

(8 notes)

android; iphone; zoolander; hype; iphone5s; isheep;

transitmaps:

My Boston T map used in “The Last of Us” PS3 game without permission or payment — Naughty Dog has been NAUGHTY
The top image above is apparently a screen capture of a new Playstation 3 game called “The Last of Us” developed by a company called Naughty Dog and released on June 14, 2013. According to Wikipedia, the game has received several “perfect” scores from game review sites and has had the biggest gaming launch of 2013, with 1.3 million units sold in its first week.
The lower image is, of course, my redesign for the Boston T map, which I first posted on the internet on March 11, 2012. Notice any similarities?
Basically, I’m fucking furious.
For a software developer — especially a big developer working on a blockbuster title like this — to casually appropriate someone else’s work and incorporate it into their game without any discussion with the owner of that work is completely unacceptable. (Not to mention hugely ironic, as the software industry is always complaining about piracy of their work.)
Naughty Dog seems to have known that they couldn’t use the official map without paying a hefty license fee, so it looks like they just went on the internet and found another one. Cos, you know, images on the internet are free for anyone to use, right? Not.
To be clear: at no point have Naughty Dog contacted me about using my intellectual property (this visual representation of the Boston rapid transit network) in their product.
To be even more clear: if you want to use my work commercially, payment before usage is required. If you’re making money from your product, then you can pay me for my work as well.
I am attempting to open communications with them now to ask where they came across the image, how it ended up in their game (with very pointed questions about their approvals and legal process), and what kind of compensation I can expect for the theft of my work.
Source: Randomly-discovered tweet (I keep track of tweets with the phrase “subway map” in them) from @Neo781, who praises the map as showing Naughty Dog’s attention to detail.
“Wow they actually accurately portray the subway map of Mass and have all the colors and names of stops correct.”, he says; to which @gavshen replies, “That’s Naughty Dog for you.”
Yep, that’s Naughty Dog: stealing my work and taking the credit for it.
Presence of my map in the game also confirmed by this post on a forum board.
Watch this space for updates. In the meantime, reblog this post as much as you can for maximum visibility. Share it on Facebook, post it to relevant Reddit subrebbits… and whatever else you can think of. I will not have my work stolen like this.

This on top of Naughty Dog using the likeness of Ellen Page without permission… http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/24/4458368/ellen-page-says-the-last-of-us-ripped-off-her-license
Monday 6/24/2013

(792 notes)

transitmaps:

My Boston T map used in “The Last of Us” PS3 game without permission or payment — Naughty Dog has been NAUGHTY

The top image above is apparently a screen capture of a new Playstation 3 game called “The Last of Us” developed by a company called Naughty Dog and released on June 14, 2013. According to Wikipedia, the game has received several “perfect” scores from game review sites and has had the biggest gaming launch of 2013, with 1.3 million units sold in its first week.

The lower image is, of course, my redesign for the Boston T map, which I first posted on the internet on March 11, 2012. Notice any similarities?

Basically, I’m fucking furious.

For a software developer — especially a big developer working on a blockbuster title like this — to casually appropriate someone else’s work and incorporate it into their game without any discussion with the owner of that work is completely unacceptable. (Not to mention hugely ironic, as the software industry is always complaining about piracy of their work.)

Naughty Dog seems to have known that they couldn’t use the official map without paying a hefty license fee, so it looks like they just went on the internet and found another one. Cos, you know, images on the internet are free for anyone to use, right? Not.

To be clear: at no point have Naughty Dog contacted me about using my intellectual property (this visual representation of the Boston rapid transit network) in their product.

To be even more clear: if you want to use my work commercially, payment before usage is required. If you’re making money from your product, then you can pay me for my work as well.

I am attempting to open communications with them now to ask where they came across the image, how it ended up in their game (with very pointed questions about their approvals and legal process), and what kind of compensation I can expect for the theft of my work.

Source: Randomly-discovered tweet (I keep track of tweets with the phrase “subway map” in them) from @Neo781, who praises the map as showing Naughty Dog’s attention to detail.

“Wow they actually accurately portray the subway map of Mass and have all the colors and names of stops correct.”, he says; to which @gavshen replies, “That’s Naughty Dog for you.”

Yep, that’s Naughty Dog: stealing my work and taking the credit for it.

Presence of my map in the game also confirmed by this post on a forum board.

Watch this space for updates. In the meantime, reblog this post as much as you can for maximum visibility. Share it on Facebook, post it to relevant Reddit subrebbits… and whatever else you can think of. I will not have my work stolen like this.

This on top of Naughty Dog using the likeness of Ellen Page without permission… http://www.theverge.com/2013/6/24/4458368/ellen-page-says-the-last-of-us-ripped-off-her-license

transitmaps:

Naked TTC Rocket Map
What goes on underneath the printed map. The lights for the future Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension stations are already in place in the upper left of the map. 
Fortunately, the map hasn’t been stolen by someone to reveal these inner workings: it’s simply been moved to the left. This being Toronto, however, it’s probably only a matter of minutes until someone makes off with it to hang on their bedroom/dorm wall.
(Source: wyliepoon/Flickr)
Monday 4/29/2013

(72 notes)

transitmaps:

Naked TTC Rocket Map

What goes on underneath the printed map. The lights for the future Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension stations are already in place in the upper left of the map.

Fortunately, the map hasn’t been stolen by someone to reveal these inner workings: it’s simply been moved to the left. This being Toronto, however, it’s probably only a matter of minutes until someone makes off with it to hang on their bedroom/dorm wall.

(Source: wyliepoon/Flickr)

London Underground Depots in minimal postcard format. Absolutely loving this set. 

www.drawnbyday.co.uk/projects/lu-depot-postcards

London Underground Depots in minimal postcard format. Absolutely loving this set.

www.drawnbyday.co.uk/projects/lu-depot-postcards

The TTC started selling these for $15.

The TTC started selling these for $15.

Dirty cartography
Monday 3/25/2013

(1 note)

map; dirty;

Dirty cartography

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Preferred Rapid Transit Scheme, Toronto, 1910
A rather lovely (and somewhat prescient) figure from a report prepared by the New York engineering firm of Jacobs & Davies for the City of Toronto in 1910. It shows plans for a system of “subway streetcars” — a combination of at-grade and subterranean routes — both ahead of its time and prohibitively expensive, especially for a modest city like Toronto at the time (which had a population of just 350,000). 
(Source: levyrapidtransit.ca via @bgilliard)

They’ve thought of a Downtown Relief Line 103 years ago…
Wednesday 3/20/2013

(42 notes)

transitmaps:

Historical Map: Preferred Rapid Transit Scheme, Toronto, 1910

A rather lovely (and somewhat prescient) figure from a report prepared by the New York engineering firm of Jacobs & Davies for the City of Toronto in 1910. It shows plans for a system of “subway streetcars” — a combination of at-grade and subterranean routes — both ahead of its time and prohibitively expensive, especially for a modest city like Toronto at the time (which had a population of just 350,000). 

(Source: levyrapidtransit.ca via @bgilliard)

They’ve thought of a Downtown Relief Line 103 years ago…